Eight (8) Proven Tips To Keep Your Writing Muscles Active

Eight (8) Proven Tips To Keep Your Writing Muscles Active
25 Oct 2016


The more one writes, the easier and more fluent it becomes. Writing regularly is the is the approach that always work – just as regular exercise keeps our bodies fit and healthy. Here are some ideas for working-out your writing muscles, which you can fit into odd minutes during the day.​

1) Write in the style of other writers you admire. This helps with mental dexterity and the flexibility to write in different styles. And it’s great fun too!

2) Learn and use a new word every day. Always look up unfamiliar words you come across and learn their meanings. Every writer should own a good dictionary – but again, you can do it for free on the internet. Type the queried word plus ‘definition’ into a search engine and you’ll come up with definitions from online dictionaries.

3) Write something, however short, every day. This not only prompt you to write regularly, it is also a useful to aid your memory, and you can use the things that you have done or observed as the basis for stories or articles.

4) Write for ten minutes without stopping, on a random subject – whatever pops into your head. Or pick a word at random from the dictionary and use that as your subject. Don’t worry about the quality of what you write – the important thing is getting your creative juices flowing. Don’t throw these short pieces away – get them out when you have more time and you may find something which can form the basis of a longer piece.

5) Describe somebody you know very well, in as much detail as you can. Don’t forget to include both their physical and mental attributes. Remember that character descriptions are about much more than external appearance – take your readers inside your characters’ heads, too.

6) Look around your writing space – whether one you’re very familiar with, or a new place – and describe it in as much detail as you can. This is good practice at really learning to observe accurately, as well as bringing your scene settings vividly alive.

7) Take your friend in tip seven, the stranger in tip eight and put them in the place described in tip six. Then write a conversation between them. Don’t forget to fit their words and actions with their personalities, age and social backgrounds.

8) Describe a stranger you have seen only once – in a café, walking by on the street, or wherever. Start with their physical attributes and what they were doing at the time. Then go on to speculate about their inner landscape.

YOURS FOR FREE! MY FIVE-STAR BOOK "FIRE UP YOUR WRITING SERIES"
The Twelve (12) Small Potent Episodes Any Writer Can Practice & Learn From. GRAB YOUR FREE COPY NOW... Did I say for free?
I hate spam. I will not share your email address with anyone. PINKY SWEAR..
Julius Kessy
Follow me

Julius Kessy

Founder and Editor in Chief at My Writers Bureau
Hi there, dreamer! I'm Julius and thanks for stopping by. I love writing well, and here at My Writers Bureau blog, I help others do the same. Feel free to browse around and leave a comment. I'll be happy to reply to you. You can also follow me on Facebook and Twitter.
Julius Kessy
Follow me

Latest posts by Julius Kessy (see all)

Share

Got any thoughts or questions? Speak your Mind! Your Comments are Welcome😊

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons
error: Content is protected !!